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UC Irvine Stem Cell Research Center Set to Launch on Friday

UC-Irvine-stem-cell-research-center-goes-online-friday

Sue and Bill Gross Hall will officially open on Friday, aimed specifically at stem cell research.

Friday May 14th will mark another important day for ongoing research into human stem cells. The University of California at Irvine (UCI) is set to open the $80 million and 100,000+ square foot Sue and Bill Gross Hall – a stem cell research center. This will be the first such research center in southern California, and the state’s first such facility designed from conception to focus on stem cells research. The hall was made possible by a $10 million dollar leading donation from Sue and Bill Gross which helped attract $27.2 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. CIRM was created through a voter sponsored initiative to bolster stem cell research in California. Additional funding came from other private donors and support from the UC system. The new center should help accelerate the development of stem cell science in a region already known for its biomedical innovation.

Any new stem cell research facility is a means for some celebration as they increase the total funds dedicated to this valuable field. Gross Hall, however, is particularly promising because of the talent found there. Interim Co-director Hans Keirstead was one of the minds behind Geron’s embryonic stem cell clinical trials (the first of their kind in the US). We saw him most recently giving a great explanation of why stem cell research needs time before it will be able to produce widely applicable therapies. As Keirstead and Geron work towards treating spinal cord injuries, other Gross faculty will work on Down’s Syndrome, Alzheimer’s, hearing loss, retinal degeneration, diabetes, and many more important illnesses. It may take years before Gross Hall produces a steady stream of stem cell discoveries, but its creation is a great sign that US research is starting to get the funding it needs and is headed in the right direction.

[image credit: Hans Keirstead/UCI]
[source: UCI Today]

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7 comments

  • CAROLINE CARR-LOCKE says:

    i am just waiting for USA to come up with a cure for my IDIOPATHIC AXONAL PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY so come on USA beat the world and MOVE THE NEEDLE there are so many of us waiting out there In scotland there is no research cure or treatment for my horrible condition i can hardly walk

  • Crystal says:

    That’s one of the most promising things about this research, it holds the potential for curative therapies for a whole spectrum of nightmare medical conditions. Nothing would show more respect for the sanctity of life than doing everything possible to move stem cell research forward quickly and in cooperation with scientists worldwide.

  • Crystal says:

    That’s one of the most promising things about this research, it holds the potential for curative therapies for a whole spectrum of nightmare medical conditions. Nothing would show more respect for the sanctity of life than doing everything possible to move stem cell research forward quickly and in cooperation with scientists worldwide.

  • Resident Evil says:

    Since New Path/Umbrella Corporation has purchased UC Irvine shouldn’t the city be remaned to “Racoon City”?

  • Resident Evil says:

    Since New Path/Umbrella Corporation has purchased UC Irvine shouldn’t the city be remaned to “Racoon City”?

  • cure for all says:

    Immune system helps transplanted stem cells navigate in central nervous system
    UCI study provides blueprint for enhanced treatment of inflammatory diseases like MS

    — Irvine, Calif., June 1, 2010 —

    By discovering how adult neural stem cells navigate to injury sites in the central nervous system, UC Irvine researchers have helped solve a puzzle in the creation of stem cell-based treatments: How do these cells know where to go?

    Tom Lane and Kevin Carbajal of the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center found the answer with the body’s immune system.

    Their study not only identifies an important targeting mechanism in transplanted stem cells but also provides a blueprint for engineering stem cell-based therapies for multiple sclerosis and other chronic neurological diseases in which inflammation occurs. Results appear in this week’s early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    http://today.uci.edu/news/2010/06/nr_lane_100601.php

  • cure for all says:

    Immune system helps transplanted stem cells navigate in central nervous system
    UCI study provides blueprint for enhanced treatment of inflammatory diseases like MS

    — Irvine, Calif., June 1, 2010 —

    By discovering how adult neural stem cells navigate to injury sites in the central nervous system, UC Irvine researchers have helped solve a puzzle in the creation of stem cell-based treatments: How do these cells know where to go?

    Tom Lane and Kevin Carbajal of the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center found the answer with the body’s immune system.

    Their study not only identifies an important targeting mechanism in transplanted stem cells but also provides a blueprint for engineering stem cell-based therapies for multiple sclerosis and other chronic neurological diseases in which inflammation occurs. Results appear in this week’s early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    http://today.uci.edu/news/2010/06/nr_lane_100601.php

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