Sweet Little Lies – The Bitter Truth About Sugar

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The average American consumes 22 teaspoons of sugar every day.

The world is hooked on sugar. Ray Kurzweil calls it the “White Satan.” And he might be onto something. The futurist guru has found overwhelming evidence that consuming refined sugar is linked to cardiovascular disease, obesity, type-2 diabetes and even cancer. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), women should consume no more than 6 teaspoons of sugar per day and men no more than 9. At 22 teaspoons of sugar consumed by the average American each day, it’s no wonder that our excessive habit is so costly. Scientific innovation is pushing human longevity past the traditional limits. Yet despite this upward trend, we’re still not much smarter about what we put in our bodies. And, according to recent studies, food manufacturers and the U.S. government aren’t doing much to curb our voracious appetite for sugar. We found a video featuring a talk by University of California professor Robert Lustig that exposes the bitter truth about sugar. Make sure you check it out below.

Here at the Hub we think the world of technology. It’s thought that by the year 2030 there will be about one million people living in the triple digits. If we lose a tooth because we ate too much sugar, we will one day replace it with our stem cells, but one simple truth remains: state-of-the-art medicine and brand-name prescriptions can’t—at least not yet—compare to a good dose of common sense. As the singularity’s fiercest advocate, Kurzweil stands by the power of human reasoning, but he also might say that in the battle against sugar, willpower isn’t to blame. The fight can seem futile at best for the more than 17 million Americans currently diagnosed with diabetes. And it seems as though the U.S. government and product manufacturers aren’t doing their share to balance a system that caters hand and foot to sugar-holics.

For one, many foods that aren’t considered desserts actually contain more sugar than their seemingly sweeter counterparts. Some foods considered more natural, like salads, might be higher in sugar if served with a sweet dressing. There isn’t much to alert consumers to this misnomer. In fact, the FDA has yet to issue regulations to control claims of what is and isn’t “natural.” Sugar is everywhere. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lists the common aliases of sugar found in most food products, and links to resources that explain how to navigate those misleading product labels we frequently forget to read. But what good is a nutritional label if it lists dubious information? The World Health Organization puts the safe amount of sugar in a healthy diet at no more than 10 percent, whereas the sugar industry in the United States has claimed that 25 percent of our diet can safely consist of sugar—a disagreement with an obvious agenda.

Sugar is subtle. Manufacturers bombard us with half-truths and misleading information on boxes and product labels are skewed to make ingredients seem more benign. It’s been suggested, for instance, that nutritional information be made less confusing by replacing “per serving” quantities with what’s present in the entire container for some products. This popular breakfast cereal is described as “lightly sweetened” on the box, yet sugar is the second ingredient listed (ingredients are generally listed in order of prominence). Websites are no different. Coca-Cola advocates for an “active, healthy lifestyle” on its nutritional information page. Here’s a novel idea: how about skipping soda altogether? Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology would agree. In a recent video presented by the UCSF’s Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Lustig exposes a few dietary myths, going so far as to call high-fructose corn syrup “poison.” It’s a long video, so if you don’t have time to watch it through (which you should), there are a few highlights not to miss: at 15:50 Lustig links Type II diabetes to sugar sweetened soft drinks; find out how juice can cause obesity at 27:21; and at 34:50 who would have thought that doughnuts could unite the world? Check out the video below.

Sugar is addictive. Sugar—along with chocolate, cheese and meat—releases an opiate-like substance that activates the brain’s reward system. So kicking the habit isn’t quite as easy as taking everything in moderation. But we as consumers have more power than we think when it comes to dictating food industry trends, which could advocate for a healthier population in the long run.

Health and longevity is on everyone’s mind. But what good is immortality if we’re riddled with disease and calamity—all because we can’t exercise a little discipline? What good is modern medicine when we demand no less than a miracle? Are we expecting technology to take the place of a healthy lifestyle? If we really want to live longer, we need to take responsibility for our bodies and stop expecting technology and medicine to clean up the mess when we can’t say ‘enough is enough.’

[image credit: Yes-Zim.com]

[source: FDA, CDC, Life Extension Magazine, Coca-Cola, Purdue University, CSPI]

Discussion — 61 Responses

  • Ancel De Lambert June 17, 2010 on 3:39 am

    I’ve done my best to get off cane sugar. I use honey in my loose leaf tea (yes I know it has its own problems), but it can be real tough when sugar features prominently in EVERY easy meal in the frozen food section or fast food chain. How much sugar is in ketchup? Does anyone ever look? How much sugar is in your bread? My dad can’t stand most of the lasagna on the market because of how sweet it is, and I agree. We have so many gastronomic problems in our society that it’s difficult to know where to start. Sugar is definitely a good place, and my snack of choice these days is dried mango, which I get from a local purveyor that uses no sugar, and it’s bomb.

  • Ancel De Lambert June 16, 2010 on 11:39 pm

    I’ve done my best to get off cane sugar. I use honey in my loose leaf tea (yes I know it has its own problems), but it can be real tough when sugar features prominently in EVERY easy meal in the frozen food section or fast food chain. How much sugar is in ketchup? Does anyone ever look? How much sugar is in your bread? My dad can’t stand most of the lasagna on the market because of how sweet it is, and I agree. We have so many gastronomic problems in our society that it’s difficult to know where to start. Sugar is definitely a good place, and my snack of choice these days is dried mango, which I get from a local purveyor that uses no sugar, and it’s bomb.

  • Eric Tatro June 17, 2010 on 11:36 am

    Even “natural” foods, such as fruits, are much higher in sugar today than they would have been throughout most of human history. From an evolutionary standpoint, sugar would have made up very, very little of our diets and would have been seasonal (fruits) or dangerous to obtain and very limited (honey.) Gary Taubes’ “Good Calories, Bad Calories” was a major eye-opener and really made me conscious of how much sugar we actually consume – as well as how it negatively impacts health.

    • Rokas Eric Tatro June 21, 2010 on 3:15 pm

      Do not confuse regular sugar and sugars from fruits. That is two different things, and you never going to get fat from fruits as from pastries and stuff like that ;)

      • Frutti Tutti Rokas December 2, 2010 on 5:59 pm

        As a person suffering from a disease called fructose malabsorption I have to say fruits and honey are equally dangerous like sugar. They are just different names for the same thing: fructose. Especially honey is closer to high fructose corn syrup in the amounts of fructose. Fruits are a primary source of fructose. Mango is also one of the fruit along with apples and pears that contain high amounts of fructose. Esp. dried fruit have even higher amounts than fresh ones. Personally I have to avoid ALL fruits and honey and high fructose corn syrup and sugar alltogether if I wish to remain without nasty irritable bowel symptoms and even depression. Not to mention I fear my condition has yet to BLOOM and become much more common due to the state of food today. Sort of like lactose intolerance but with fructose. Maybe then people will wake up? :P

        So actually you are consuming a lot of fructose even with fruit and no it’s not healthy to consume large amounts of fruit either. Everything in moderation is a good rule.

        I wish people would acknowledge that fruit and sugar are not that far from each other and that fruit is not any healthier than sugar, well aside from having vitamin C. They are both “natural” products containing fructose and were never meant to be consumed in large amounts like so many of us do today(but not by fault of our own!). Do not condemn yourself for having a little sugar like honey or fruit every now and then. An apple a day keeps the doctor at bay, as long as it is that ONE apple per day and no more. We ARE allowed to have a little sugar every now and then as long as we understand the effects it has on our well being! :)

  • Eric Tatro June 17, 2010 on 7:36 am

    Even “natural” foods, such as fruits, are much higher in sugar today than they would have been throughout most of human history. From an evolutionary standpoint, sugar would have made up very, very little of our diets and would have been seasonal (fruits) or dangerous to obtain and very limited (honey.) Gary Taubes’ “Good Calories, Bad Calories” was a major eye-opener and really made me conscious of how much sugar we actually consume – as well as how it negatively impacts health.

    • Rokas Eric Tatro June 21, 2010 on 11:15 am

      Do not confuse regular sugar and sugars from fruits. That is two different things, and you never going to get fat from fruits as from pastries and stuff like that ;)

  • Peter Ashley June 17, 2010 on 3:04 pm

    The “sugar” problem is yet another example of the most important problem that pervades the societies of today. It is about the greed as the most common “business practice” nowadays. Somewhere down the road we traded the long honored tradition of always picking the hard way to reap the most benefits for the short term gratification. Which creates a society full of “parasites”, instead a society of builders our forfathers had so diligently built. When one combines greed with the addictivness of sugar, the business gets very dishonest. So the name of the game is “pick the latest weak spot of our consumers and bleed them dry”. In order to really benefit from all the new knowledge and advancements being made we also need firm and hones business practices to support them, empower the customers with tools to keep the businesses in check.

  • Peter Ashley June 17, 2010 on 11:04 am

    The “sugar” problem is yet another example of the most important problem that pervades the societies of today. It is about the greed as the most common “business practice” nowadays. Somewhere down the road we traded the long honored tradition of always picking the hard way to reap the most benefits for the short term gratification. Which creates a society full of “parasites”, instead a society of builders our forfathers had so diligently built. When one combines greed with the addictivness of sugar, the business gets very dishonest. So the name of the game is “pick the latest weak spot of our consumers and bleed them dry”. In order to really benefit from all the new knowledge and advancements being made we also need firm and hones business practices to support them, empower the customers with tools to keep the businesses in check.

  • jacques hughes June 18, 2010 on 12:12 am

    Very informative, if a little scary. The pervasiveness of HFCS and sucrose is worrying, mostly because it isn’t openly identified on food packaging. And the incipient creep into children’s drinks and all fast foods is a crime. Let’s get the science out there. Everyone is eager to try the newest fad diet, how about one that actually works?

  • jacques hughes June 17, 2010 on 8:12 pm

    Very informative, if a little scary. The pervasiveness of HFCS and sucrose is worrying, mostly because it isn’t openly identified on food packaging. And the incipient creep into children’s drinks and all fast foods is a crime. Let’s get the science out there. Everyone is eager to try the newest fad diet, how about one that actually works?

  • Crow June 18, 2010 on 3:55 pm

    I don’t see how it can be a surprise to anyone that T2 diabetes is linked to sugar. This is common knowledge, people.

    Besides, I’d appreciate if the writers for the ‘hub stopped writing as if USA was the only country in the world. Or as if they are the only readers. In Norway, the scene is shifted, even though we also have certain problems with overconsumption of sugar.

    • Keith Kleiner Crow June 19, 2010 on 2:26 am

      Crow,

      You make a good point. We will try not to be so US centric with our writing in the future.

      • Australia Keith Kleiner June 22, 2010 on 1:49 pm

        likes this

  • Crow June 18, 2010 on 11:55 am

    I don’t see how it can be a surprise to anyone that T2 diabetes is linked to sugar. This is common knowledge, people.

    Besides, I’d appreciate if the writers for the ‘hub stopped writing as if USA was the only country in the world. Or as if they are the only readers. In Norway, the scene is shifted, even though we also have certain problems with overconsumption of sugar.

    • Keith Kleiner Crow June 18, 2010 on 10:26 pm

      Crow,

      You make a good point. We will try not to be so US centric with our writing in the future.

      • Australia Keith Kleiner June 22, 2010 on 9:49 am

        likes this

  • Ancel De Lambert June 18, 2010 on 6:40 pm

    Here’s an idea. Create a bacteria that reacts to large amounts of fructose by releasing a hormone that stimulates insulin creation. The bacteria will be unable to reproduce and will not eat any of the fructose. The bacteria will self destruct once it runs out of resources, keeping it from evolving into something nasty, and it will help us curb our cravings by telling our brain we’re full.

    • Jeremy Ancel De Lambert June 19, 2010 on 1:14 am

      Here’s an idea. Create a bacteria that reacts with chemicals found in healthy foods to release an opiate-like substance and another to block the opiate release of sugar. And of course, taste bud alterations, etc. Why find a way to make us survive corn syrup when we can make ourselves enjoy corn?

  • Ancel De Lambert June 18, 2010 on 2:40 pm

    Here’s an idea. Create a bacteria that reacts to large amounts of fructose by releasing a hormone that stimulates insulin creation. The bacteria will be unable to reproduce and will not eat any of the fructose. The bacteria will self destruct once it runs out of resources, keeping it from evolving into something nasty, and it will help us curb our cravings by telling our brain we’re full.

    • Jeremy Ancel De Lambert June 18, 2010 on 9:14 pm

      Here’s an idea. Create a bacteria that reacts with chemicals found in healthy foods to release an opiate-like substance and another to block the opiate release of sugar. And of course, taste bud alterations, etc. Why find a way to make us survive corn syrup when we can make ourselves enjoy corn?

  • steve June 19, 2010 on 4:30 am

    Boy, this Lustig fellow sounds just like Glenn Beck.

  • steve June 19, 2010 on 12:30 am

    Boy, this Lustig fellow sounds just like Glenn Beck.

  • Oliver June 19, 2010 on 7:42 am

    As much as I like the critical reading of nutrition labels…

    I’m a bit confused here – you attack the “lightly sweetened” label on the grounds of the position of sugar in the ingredients (of which there *are* only four, besides vitamins/minerals), but don’t go for the HFCS, which is third, and the actual sugar content (regardless of the sources) isn’t even mentioned?

  • Oliver June 19, 2010 on 3:42 am

    As much as I like the critical reading of nutrition labels…

    I’m a bit confused here – you attack the “lightly sweetened” label on the grounds of the position of sugar in the ingredients (of which there *are* only four, besides vitamins/minerals), but don’t go for the HFCS, which is third, and the actual sugar content (regardless of the sources) isn’t even mentioned?

  • steve June 19, 2010 on 6:01 pm

    Greedy corporations like Kenwood Vineyards, Veuve Clicquot, Metropolis Wine Merchants, Siena Imports, etc. should be sued & shut down for knowingly selling a sugar based product that is proven addictive & has been a destroyer of many lives.

    How many teenaged alcoholics should we suffer before we awake to the fact that we are being sold a bill of goods by these greedy merchants of poison?

    Think of our social responsibility to protect the lives & health of our fellow citizens. Think of all the money we waist on medical treatment for people, like David Crosby, with liver decease caused by consuming the toxins of wine & whiskey.

    • Oliver steve June 19, 2010 on 10:57 pm

      Are you arguing sugars should be as strongly regulated as alcohol? I’m all for that…

      • steve Oliver June 20, 2010 on 7:28 am

        indeed, it should be. I think sweets of any sort should be forbidden to anyone under the age of 21. In fact, all pleasure should be watched very closely because it only leads to bodily decadence & the collapse of society. Damn Dr. Graham’s Honey Biscuits! Made to assuage unhealthy carnal urges in children but now we have a nation full of far worse.

      • Alcohol Oliver December 2, 2010 on 6:07 pm

        most alcohol today = all sugar

        not that far off there…

  • steve June 19, 2010 on 2:01 pm

    Greedy corporations like Kenwood Vineyards, Veuve Clicquot, Metropolis Wine Merchants, Siena Imports, etc. should be sued & shut down for knowingly selling a sugar based product that is proven addictive & has been a destroyer of many lives.

    How many teenaged alcoholics should we suffer before we awake to the fact that we are being sold a bill of goods by these greedy merchants of poison?

    Think of our social responsibility to protect the lives & health of our fellow citizens. Think of all the money we waist on medical treatment for people, like David Crosby, with liver decease caused by consuming the toxins of wine & whiskey.

    • Oliver steve June 19, 2010 on 6:57 pm

      Are you arguing sugars should be as strongly regulated as alcohol? I’m all for that…

      • steve Oliver June 20, 2010 on 3:28 am

        indeed, it should be. I think sweets of any sort should be forbidden to anyone under the age of 21. In fact, all pleasure should be watched very closely because it only leads to bodily decadence & the collapse of society. Damn Dr. Graham’s Honey Biscuits! Made to assuage unhealthy carnal urges in children but now we have a nation full of far worse.

  • Oregon_hippy June 20, 2010 on 1:36 am

    Sugar is only half the problem. The byproduct of flour enriching/bleaching processes, known as Alloxan, is in equally as many products as sugar is, if not more. Alloxan destroys beta cells in the pancreas and also leads to Diabetes.

    • Jeremiah Lemmas Oregon_hippy July 5, 2010 on 6:00 am

      “Because it selectively kills the insulin-producing beta-cells found in the pancreas, alloxan is used to induce diabetes in laboratory animals. This occurs most likely because of selective uptake of the compound due to its structural similarity to glucose as well as the beta-cell’s highly efficient uptake mechanism (GLUT2).
      However, alloxan is not toxic to the human beta-cell, even in very high doses, probably due to differing glucose uptake mechanisms in humans and rodents.[6][7]Alloxan is, however, toxic to the liver and the kidneys in high doses.[citation needed]”
      from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alloxan

  • Oregon_hippy June 19, 2010 on 9:36 pm

    Sugar is only half the problem. The byproduct of flour enriching/bleaching processes, known as Alloxan, is in equally as many products as sugar is, if not more. Alloxan destroys beta cells in the pancreas and also leads to Diabetes.

    • Jeremiah Lemmas Oregon_hippy July 5, 2010 on 2:00 am

      “Because it selectively kills the insulin-producing beta-cells found in the pancreas, alloxan is used to induce diabetes in laboratory animals. This occurs most likely because of selective uptake of the compound due to its structural similarity to glucose as well as the beta-cell’s highly efficient uptake mechanism (GLUT2).
      However, alloxan is not toxic to the human beta-cell, even in very high doses, probably due to differing glucose uptake mechanisms in humans and rodents.[6][7]Alloxan is, however, toxic to the liver and the kidneys in high doses.[citation needed]”
      from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alloxan

  • Sachin June 20, 2010 on 3:34 am

    this is really an eye opener for me…thanks

  • Sachin June 19, 2010 on 11:34 pm

    this is really an eye opener for me…thanks

  • Peter June 20, 2010 on 11:03 am

    Gosh, you’re a retard. Look at the box closely. Sugar is #2. High fructose corn syrup is #3. Companies get away with not making sugar ingredient #1 by splitting it among several ingredients (sugar+cane juice+high fructose corn syrup+honey+others). Always look at sugar by weight.

    In this case, it looks above average, actually. 12g out of 59g. I wouldn’t want to eat it (1/4 sugar), but many cereals are half sugar.

  • Peter June 20, 2010 on 7:03 am

    Gosh, you’re a retard. Look at the box closely. Sugar is #2. High fructose corn syrup is #3. Companies get away with not making sugar ingredient #1 by splitting it among several ingredients (sugar+cane juice+high fructose corn syrup+honey+others). Always look at sugar by weight.

    In this case, it looks above average, actually. 12g out of 59g. I wouldn’t want to eat it (1/4 sugar), but many cereals are half sugar.

  • Nikki June 20, 2010 on 4:47 pm

    i think this site is so stupid sugar is a part of our life if you get addicted to it then thats your own problem dont know how you people can blame sugar because your all fat thats your own fault and the comment i read sayin all sweets should be forbidden to anyone under 21 is ridiculous its not the children’s fault its the parents for feeding it to them everyone get a life!!!!!!

    • Bob Nikki November 6, 2010 on 5:48 pm

      Hey Nikki, Your a good example of an idiot! This is society today…open your eyes! Stop making other countries look dumb with your stupidity. Personnaly im sure nobody cares to hear your comments. You are obvioulsy the 1 in a million that has no bad habits or family members that eat sugar….not to mention you obvioulsy dont have children. Who knows maybe this is your way of saying your worse then the rest of the world with your own personal addiction to sugar !

    • Ooo Nikki December 2, 2010 on 6:16 pm

      The problem is how hard it is to find REAL FOOD in this sugarhole of a syrup society today. When you have an illness that prevents you from eating all sugar then most products in a everyday normal food market are off limits for you and it sucks. It really is a battle for survival and finding actual natural food to eat…

  • Nikki June 20, 2010 on 12:47 pm

    i think this site is so stupid sugar is a part of our life if you get addicted to it then thats your own problem dont know how you people can blame sugar because your all fat thats your own fault and the comment i read sayin all sweets should be forbidden to anyone under 21 is ridiculous its not the children’s fault its the parents for feeding it to them everyone get a life!!!!!!

  • Yaa101 June 20, 2010 on 11:01 pm

    I do not believe sugar will be a problem in the longer run, I think that like with cooked food we will cross another boundary that will bring a major boost to our brains. If you have paid attention to anthropological findings of recent years you would have know that cooking food has made us what we are today, more than anything else in our environment. This change of diet brought us excessive energy and changed our whole being in a relative narrow time frame. Of course people will die from excessive sugar usage, but then they die from many other causes too. A group of people will not die from this and will take us humankind to another revolutionary genetic change and will use this excessive energy reserve to power even greater brain usage, call it singularity if you want… ;-)

  • Yaa101 June 20, 2010 on 7:01 pm

    I do not believe sugar will be a problem in the longer run, I think that like with cooked food we will cross another boundary that will bring a major boost to our brains. If you have paid attention to anthropological findings of recent years you would have know that cooking food has made us what we are today, more than anything else in our environment. This change of diet brought us excessive energy and changed our whole being in a relative narrow time frame. Of course people will die from excessive sugar usage, but then they die from many other causes too. A group of people will not die from this and will take us humankind to another revolutionary genetic change and will use this excessive energy reserve to power even greater brain usage, call it singularity if you want… ;-)

  • Tom Dolan June 20, 2010 on 9:34 pm

    I’m incensed to learn that our FDA, Department of Agriculture and food industry are responsible for our obesity problem. Somebody needs to lead a crusade to fix this. Where do I sign up? Newsweek should interview Dr. Lustig. WHAT THE AMERICAN PEOPLE SHOULD KNOW

    • Nikki Tom Dolan June 22, 2010 on 2:12 am

      your obesity problem is no body’s fault but your own that’s the problem with people like you its never your fault is it just remember no body forces it down ya neck do they n i ain’t American!

      • Kalki Nikki June 22, 2010 on 6:06 am

        do you know what sarcasm means? :)

  • Tom Dolan June 20, 2010 on 9:35 pm

    WHAT THE AMERICAN PEOPLE SHOULD KNOW — AND DON’T.

  • Ian June 21, 2010 on 2:01 am

    I’ve been trying to avoid sugar for about 6 months after lossing 30lbs in 2 months, on a sugar free diet. The stuff is in virtually everything – and needlessly too. Why does shredded wheat need sugar … I’ve only found 1 brand that is sugar free – and only 3 or 4 cereals in total. It is also really hard to find packaged foods without sugar. Even most pre-seasoned meats have added sugar! I’ve ended up turning to natural foods and having to prepare most foods from scratch – which, unfortunately, does not always prove to be easy, or convenient.

    • Sumatra Ian June 21, 2010 on 6:55 am

      I’m trying to avoid sugar, but sweetened food is a big problem. Sugar is in everything! I don’t know why it is the case, but it surely limits people’s choice of choosing healthy food. I have heard that “sugar-free” (light) food and drinks are actually scams and are not good. If they don’t contain sugar, than they contain other unhealthy chemicals. I don’t know if this is really true, since I never bothered really to investigate, but I have heard that from several people so I avoid light drinks. I try to switch sweets with fruits, but as Eric said in the second comment, they are more sweet than before. I just hope that is the real natural sugar, not artificial (well, it’s in fruits, isn’t it?).

  • Ian June 20, 2010 on 10:01 pm

    I’ve been trying to avoid sugar for about 6 months after lossing 30lbs in 2 months, on a sugar free diet. The stuff is in virtually everything – and needlessly too. Why does shredded wheat need sugar … I’ve only found 1 brand that is sugar free – and only 3 or 4 cereals in total. It is also really hard to find packaged foods without sugar. Even most pre-seasoned meats have added sugar! I’ve ended up turning to natural foods and having to prepare most foods from scratch – which, unfortunately, does not always prove to be easy, or convenient.

    • Sumatra Ian June 21, 2010 on 2:55 am

      I’m trying to avoid sugar, but sweetened food is a big problem. Sugar is in everything! I don’t know why it is the case, but it surely limits people’s choice of choosing healthy food. I have heard that “sugar-free” (light) food and drinks are actually scams and are not good. If they don’t contain sugar, than they contain other unhealthy chemicals. I don’t know if this is really true, since I never bothered really to investigate, but I have heard that from several people so I avoid light drinks. I try to switch sweets with fruits, but as Eric said in the second comment, they are more sweet than before. I just hope that is the real natural sugar, not artificial (well, it’s in fruits, isn’t it?).

  • Nikki June 22, 2010 on 6:12 am

    your obesity problem is no body’s fault but your own that’s the problem with people like you its never your fault is it just remember no body forces it down ya neck do they n i ain’t American!

    • Kalki Nikki June 22, 2010 on 10:06 am

      do you know what sarcasm means? :)

  • marry heykens August 10, 2010 on 8:01 am

    Chocolade goodness, niam niam love it

  • marry heykens August 10, 2010 on 4:01 am

    Chocolade goodness, niam niam love it

  • craig August 18, 2010 on 6:22 pm

    If the assumption is that all problems can be solved via technology, why such old fashioned “pre-singularity” thinking as though we don’t already know about sugar – and alcohol – and many other things that humans are inclined to get hooked on. If humans are going to benefit from the singularity , or even the present “really smart thinker years” like we are in right now – I hope it’s going to be more than just common sense advice from the last 200 years such as eat your vegetables and abstain from the devil’s vices!
    Wow…. that’s really exponentially new and improved thinking! I think I prefer to be raptured by God and get an instant Glorified body with an eternal guarantee instead of this old Wizard of Oz snake oil line……

  • craig August 18, 2010 on 2:22 pm

    If the assumption is that all problems can be solved via technology, why such old fashioned “pre-singularity” thinking as though we don’t already know about sugar – and alcohol – and many other things that humans are inclined to get hooked on. If humans are going to benefit from the singularity , or even the present “really smart thinker years” like we are in right now – I hope it’s going to be more than just common sense advice from the last 200 years such as eat your vegetables and abstain from the devil’s vices!
    Wow…. that’s really exponentially new and improved thinking! I think I prefer to be raptured by God and get an instant Glorified body with an eternal guarantee instead of this old Wizard of Oz snake oil line……

  • Bonnie Grissom February 7, 2011 on 6:17 pm

    I believe that I should have the right to decide whether to consume 1 teaspoon full of sugar or 3 cups if I want to. If the government gets into governing what we eat, we are no better than their cattle. If you think that smart thinking people should dictate what consumers eat then beware that the next thing to go will be what you least expect. There is always someone who is smarter than you who thinks they know better. Could it be that there are too many people who are blind followers, who listen and believe every thing they hear from someone who has a touted dialogue. Most folks have heard the propaganda of unhealthy consumptions but it should be up to them to determine whether they die young or old. There are still plenty of people who die at 100 that have consumed eggs and bacon every morning for breakfast and had a piece of pie and ice cream for dessert. The problem of sugar should not be in the hands of those who feel because they can’t eat it that nobody else should be able to eat it or those who feel it is their God given right to control what other people eat.