Thinking Surveillance System, Vitamin D Video, Now For Sale

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vitamin d video surveillance software
Vitamin D Video is out of beta and ready to purchase. Better still, the most basic package is free!

Ground breaking surveillance software, Vitamin D Video, is now available for sale at an impressively low price. I had a chance to review the program’s impressive object recognition and recording capabilities when I covered the beta launch a few months ago. This is a really cool application of limited artificial intelligence. Vitamin D Video uses algorithms based on human brain activity to quickly identify objects in a video feed. By setting the controls, you can specify events that will trigger a recording, an email alert, or an audio notice. Vitamin D not only acts like an electronic watchdog for your camera, it can take hours of monotonous footage and reduce it down to a highlight reel you want to watch. During the beta, testers used the program for some really cool applications you can read about on the VDV site. Interested in getting a copy for yourself? It’s free if you only want to use it on one camera. Two cameras and you’ll have to pay $50. Or you can pay $200 and use as many cameras as you like from one computer. That cheap price tag could launch Vitamin D Video to dominate the small business and home market. Catch a new demo video of the program below.

Vitamin D Video is based on Hierarchical Temporal Memory (HTM), a learning and pattern recognition technology developed by Numenta. HTM is modeled on the activity of the human neocortex, and that’s the sort of brain-based narrow AI that really gets us excited here at the Hub. Sure, Vitamin D Video is likely to make some major waves by offering effective and inexpensive surveillance software. More importantly though, HTM and other brain-based technologies will continue to leverage the lessons of neuroscience to further the development of AI. It makes you wonder what kind of awesome technology we’ll get once the Blue Brain Project and other such neurological endeavors are finished. Maybe one day we’ll have cheap software that protects and serves instead of just observing and reporting.

[screen capture and video credit: Vitamin D Video]