Not since last year's TacoCopter fiasco has there been such a vague and ominous potential use for multicopters to hit the web. Last week, the golf company Titleist tweeted a photo of a rather monstrous multicopter with a camera hovering over the shoulder of pro golfer Scott Stallings. It looks a bit makeshift and draws more similarity to War of the Worlds than intended, no doubt, but the point of it is clear: even more camera angles to watch golfers in action.

Little else is known about the system except that it is associated with the Golf Channel and has been dubbed the "Hover Fly Aerial Camera."

golf channel drone camera

Now remote control (RC) helicopters have been used in filming golf tournaments for years, so this isn't groundbreaking news. A number of aerial photography companies are even starting to replace their helicopters with multicopters, while they wait for government regulation to ease. The FAA, which oversees the flying of drones in the US, is drafting policies for their use due to increased demand. In a recent report, the agency stated that over 50 companies and organizations are producing some 150+ unmanned aircraft and predicted that there were will be 10,000 commercial drones in the skies within the next five years.

Could multicopters end up covering tournaments or even replace the SkyCam system used in stadiums at present? Not until they get smaller and a lot quieter. Uncheck the mute button in the Vine video below to hear the beast in action:

Considering the pace of golf, it's quite possible that some day autonomous multicopters could hover above golfers and help them analyze their swing. That may seem excessive, but golf isn't necessarily a sport for the frugal, now is it?

[image: Twitter]

I've been writing for Singularity Hub since 2011 and have been Editor-in-Chief since 2014. My interests cover digital education, publishing, and media, but I'll always be a chemist at heart.