14 responses

  1. why06
    why06
    July 9, 2011

    good for Beyene, and good for science of medicine as a whole. I wonder if they used a 3D printer to create the scaffold or am I misinformed what a scaffold would be made of.

  2. Joe Nickence
    July 9, 2011

    I believe the key word here is nanotechnology. Two days to grow a living trachea? If that isn’t science fiction come true, we are truly deceiving ourselves, and will wake from some dream very sad for the awakening.

  3. blue17
    July 9, 2011

    I’m 45 years old and I have been waiting all my life to see this. For the past 13 years I have worked with sick and injured as an occupational therapist. It’s only in a role like mine, or if it happens to you or a loved one, where you can really appreciate the profound depths of human suffering caused by things like, for instance oro-pharyngeal cancer.

    By this point in my career, I have no idea how many people and families I’ve actually worked with, but for the most part all we do is pad the edges, and help people and those around them come to terms with the destruction of their lives (and human potential).

    I feel like Neil de Grasse Tyson when he said he wanted to grab people on the street and shake them and demand if they’ve heard of this.

    • klas
      July 10, 2011

      “I feel like Neil de Grasse Tyson when he said he wanted to grab people on the street and shake them and demand if they’ve heard of this.”

      That’s something I feel quite regularly. There’s so much amazing thins going on in the world of science and technology that most people simply aren’t aware of. They would be if mainstream media cared more about these subjects (the fact that they don’t could of course be because people don’t care, though). At least this particular — and incredibly encouraging! — story got a lot of media coverage.

  4. Ivan Malagurski
    July 10, 2011

    Amazing work…

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