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Arlington Hewes

Arlington Hewes

I enjoy all types of futurology. I especially enjoy staying up to date with the latest advancements in machine learning and artificial intelligence. You can usually find me roaming the depths of the internet.

From This Author


Futuristic Medical Implant Powered by Sound Waves

Not so long ago we covered a miniature, ant-sized computer chip designed to be embedded in everyday stuff to make it smarter. Instead of a cumbersome battery in need of constant recharging—the chip is powered...

Transparent Graphene-Based Implants to Grant Clearer View of the Brain

A new implantable brain chip developed by the University of Madison-Wisconsin may help advance our understanding of the human brain. The chip is flexible, transparent, biocompatible—and uses a graphene sensor array just four atoms thick. To understand a...

Cancer Metastasis Reduced Up to 90% in Mice Using Engineered Decoy Protein

Cancer often begins in one part of the body but spreads elsewhere via the bloodstream or lymphatic system. This spreading, called metastasis, makes the disease deadly and difficult to halt—even using chemotherapy drugs with...

Promising Method for Detecting Pancreatic Cancer Years Before Traditional Diagnosis

In cancer diagnosis, earlier is better—treatments are more effective and so survival is more likely too. Some forms, like skin or breast cancer, lend themselves to early detection with regular checkups as they can be...

This Algorithm Finds the Safest Neighborhood Close to a McDonald’s Just From Photos

The list of things computers can do better than humans is already long, and it’s getting longer every year. Now, you can add making environmental inferences. We pride ourselves on the ability to read between...

Artificial Cells Created that Change Shape and Move On their Own

In the future, tiny machines may swim through our bloodstream repairing damage, attacking invaders, or taking real-time readings. We might even model such machines on biology. But biological cells are incredibly complex microscopic machines—and the...

Experimental Rat ‘Brain’ Fighter Pilot May Yield Insights Into How the Brain Works

In an experiment to study how neurons form networks and compute, Thomas DeMarse, a University of Florida professor of biomedical engineering, says his lab-grown rat “brain” in a dish can fly a simulated F-22...

DARPA’s New Initiative Aims to Make Nanoscale Machines a Reality

For much of history, builders and makers fixated on the monumental—pyramids, cathedrals, skyscrapers, aircraft carriers. Increasingly, however, the cutting edge focus is smaller. Much smaller. The field of nanotechnology aims to build components or...

Unlocking the Mystery of Limb Regeneration: Genes for Lizard Tail Regrowth Determined

For people who've lost a limb, advances in materials and 3D printing have produced a slew of new prosthetics that deliver greater mobility, custom fitting, and sleek designs. Yet the ability to completely regrow a lost limb remains daunting, despite...

Thousand-Robot Swarm Hints at Future Car, Drone, Even Nanobot Collectives

When you think nanorobot, you don’t think just one. Or ten. You think millions or billions. Huge swarms of nanobots may work in concert with each other to accomplish tasks on tiny scales, perhaps in the...

Lab-Grown Neurons Deliver a Real-Time Glimpse Into How the Brain Works

Currently, researchers study the human brain by inference. Because they can’t closely observe a living brain in the lab as its owner goes about his day—they do the next best thing, tracking blood flow and...

Robotic Suit Makes Chunks of Metal Light as Feathers for Korean Shipyard Workers

It started long ago, the merger of man and machine. Power looms for hands, cars and trains for legs, and recently, computers for memory. Now, as robotic suits approach practicality, we’re climbing inside our...

These Battery-Free, WiFi Devices Run On Radio Waves

In the last decade, mobile devices have become radically smaller and more powerful. The list of tech-related tasks that the miniature black monolith we all tote around has grown longer by the year. The next step in...

Promising Early Results on Universal Blood Test for Cancer

Absent an outright cure, it’s thought that early diagnosis of terminal diseases like cancer make treatment more effective and raise the probability of survival. But diagnosis is not always straightforward and often requires costly...

Software Bot Produces Up To 10,000 Wikipedia Entries Per Day

While Internet trolls and members of Congress wage war over edits on Wikipedia, Swedish university administrator Sverker Johansson has spent the last seven years becoming the most prolific author...by a long shot. In fact, he's responsible for over...

New Super-Black, Light-Absorbing Material Looks Like a Hole in Reality

UK nanotechnology company, Surrey NanoSystems, has created what they say is the darkest material known to man. Vantablack consists of a dense forest of carbon nanotubes—single atom carbon tubes 10,000 times thinner than a...

Study Finds a Genetic Link to Autism, Researchers Hope to Find More

Doctors currently diagnose autism by observing behavioral symptoms, but in a study conducted by 13 institutions and including almost 4,000 children with autism, scientists uncovered a clear genetic link in a few cases. The...

Magnetically Guided Nanoparticles to Target and Destroy Diseased Cells

Currently, we take the shotgun approach to treatments for diseases like cancer. The body is indiscriminately bombarded with drugs and radiation harmful to diseased and healthy cells alike. While we may not cure cancer...

Algorithm Hunts Rare Genetic Disorders from Facial Features in Photos

Even before birth, concerned parents often fret over the possibility that their children may have underlying medical issues. Chief among these worries are rare genetic conditions that can drastically shape the course and reduce...

Step Aside Google Image Search, Here’s an Algorithm that Knows What’s in a Picture

The internet is a wealth of information. But you have to know what you’re looking for. If you only know a basic category—like that weird looking modern chair at your buddy's office—not so good. Search...

A Straightforward Method for Making Wearable Tech

Considering the pace of technological growth in recent decades, the convergence of humans and machines seems a foregone conclusion. Yet, unlike most machines, the body is far too flexible and squishy for modern advanced materials. So it falls on researchers to develop new...

Facial transplants are safe, viable, and help patients thrive after a decade of success

Since first becoming available in 2005, 28 people have undergone a full or partial facial transplant—a procedure described by Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez as the “Mount Everest” of medical-surgical treatments. Rodriguez is a plastic and reconstructive...

Materials repair themselves automatically and repeatedly, similar to the way cuts heal

Small cracks that develop within the fiberglass bodies of modern cars and planes can quickly turn into irreversible damage, which undermines their structural integrity. Unfortunately, the materials used to construct these vehicles, called fiber-reinforced composites, are challenging...

Have researchers found the ‘fattening gene’?

Collaborating German and Japanese scientists have studied mice lacking a gene that plays a central role in energy metabolism. Their findings? The mice maintain their normal weight, despite consuming foods high in fats. "We established that Sirt7-knockout mice...

Charting The Route: SH Week In Review 9.8.12

This is the first of a new weekly series here at Singularity Hub where we will summarize the stories and ideas that headlined the week of news. The concept of a customizable future, once the...
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SH Interviews Vernor Vinge – How Will We Get To The Technological Singularity?

Science Fiction: it has been a muse of geeks, techies and scientists for decades. Many of the technologies we explore on Singularity Hub were first imagined and explored in SF (star trek tricorders, the...

Julian Assange: The Facebook Has You

With the increase and further development of communication technologies, everyone is concerned with the impact it will have on the individual’s privacy. Social networking and other internet services like geo-location, which we have covered...

Children of Guanajuato, Mexico in Biometric D-Base

Biometrics is penetrating deeper into our lives than ever before. Next-generation passports with stored fingerprint data are being issued in almost every country. Russia is moving toward a universal identification card, supposed to arrive...

Pharm. Company Roche Blocking Blindness Cure. Why?

Many great scientific discoveries were born out of pure accident.  How about curing blindness in only one or two treatments with a drug that was originally designed to combat cancer? What if it only...

First New Treatment for Lupus Erythematosus in Over Fifty Years!

A small, but significant victory has been won in the war against lupus, one of the most debilitating systemic auto-immune diseases. The US FDA approved experimental drug Benlysta, the brainchild of Human Genome Sciences...

Lifelogging Invades the Delivery Room – Privacy in the Digital Age

The birth of a child is most certainly a momentous occasion, one that deserves to be recorded somehow. When I was born, video cameras were not yet available to the general public, so my...

At Least Half of Americans Diabetic or Pre-Diabetic by 2020

We have heard for years that diabetes is a serious problem in America, but people really do not like to listen. The result of such stupidity is 52% of Americans being diabetic or pre-diabetic...

This Fall, Don’t Forget Your DNA on Your Way to College

Thanks to new programs at UC-Berkeley and Stanford University, some students around the country have a new item to add to their back to school lists this fall--DNA samples. While the two programs are set...

Body 2.0 Here We Come: Fitbit Tracks Your Vital Signs 24/7

In the midst of the data and gadget revolutions, a new, crossbreed movement is emerging: around-the-clock health information tracking devices. With healthcare growing more and more expensive, people are turning to alternative ways to take...

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