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Longevity


The advances benefiting human longevity. Follow along as Singularity Hub discusses the future of health and latest trends in longevity.

Can We Really Live to 1,000? CNBC Interviews Aubrey de Grey to Find Out

At this year's Exponential Medicine conference, CNBC was present to probe faculty about some of the exciting developments within accelerating technologies. One of the most eye-opening speakers is Aubrey de Grey, cofounder and Chief Science...

Exponential Medicine: Craig Venter Estimates 5 Million Complete Human Genomes Sequenced by 2020

Researchers finished the first draft of the human genome in the year 2000. Although the decreasing cost of the technology has far outpaced Moore’s Law since then, we have yet to fully leverage all...

Next-Gen Diagnostics, Nanotechnology, and Bioengineering Begin Taking the Fight to Cancer

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cancer claimed 8.2 million lives worldwide in 2012. Perhaps no other disease highlights the need for improved diagnostic and treatment options better than cancer—which is why it’s...

Womb Transplant Leads to Successful Birth for Swedish Mother

In 1978, Louise Joy Brown made human history as the first “test tube baby” ever born after her mother underwent a revolutionary fertility treatment known as in-vitro fertilization (IVF). In the following decades, several...

A Blood Test for Depression Moves Closer to Reality

With the recent and highly publicized death of actor Robin Williams, depression is once again making national headlines. And for good reason. Usually, the conversation about depression turns to the search for effective treatments,...

Promising Method for Detecting Pancreatic Cancer Years Before Traditional Diagnosis

In cancer diagnosis, earlier is better—treatments are more effective and so survival is more likely too. Some forms, like skin or breast cancer, lend themselves to early detection with regular checkups as they can be...

Predicting and Preventing the Spread of Infectious Disease with Google Earth

In the film Minority Report, PreCrime police combine psychic premonitions with search and surveillance technology to prevent murders before they occur, resulting in a homicide-free society. Could a similar approach ultimately eradicate infectious diseases like malaria? A recent project at UC San Francisco to leverage Google Earth is aiming to do...

Unlocking the Mystery of Limb Regeneration: Genes for Lizard Tail Regrowth Determined

For people who've lost a limb, advances in materials and 3D printing have produced a slew of new prosthetics that deliver greater mobility, custom fitting, and sleek designs. Yet the ability to completely regrow a lost limb remains daunting, despite...

We Justify Human Suffering Because We’ve Never Had a Choice in the Matter

Buddha believed the way to end human suffering was the regular practice of meditation and introspection. But Buddha didn’t have biotech. If our suffering stems from biological and genetic factors and a cocktail of bodily substances...

Lab-Grown Neurons Deliver a Real-Time Glimpse Into How the Brain Works

Currently, researchers study the human brain by inference. Because they can’t closely observe a living brain in the lab as its owner goes about his day—they do the next best thing, tracking blood flow and...

If the Body Is a Machine, Can It Be Maintained Indefinitely?

To Aubrey de Grey, the body is a machine. Just as a restored classic car can celebrate its hundredth birthday in peak condition, in the future, we’ll maintain our bodies' cellular components to stave off the diseases of...

Promising Early Results on Universal Blood Test for Cancer

Absent an outright cure, it’s thought that early diagnosis of terminal diseases like cancer make treatment more effective and raise the probability of survival. But diagnosis is not always straightforward and often requires costly...

Evidence of Abundance #2: Maternal and Infant Mortality

100 years ago, child birth was risky and infant mortality rates were horrific. How would you feel if 30% of infants died? Or if 900 expectant mothers out of every 100,000 died giving birth? But thanks...

Study Finds a Genetic Link to Autism, Researchers Hope to Find More

Doctors currently diagnose autism by observing behavioral symptoms, but in a study conducted by 13 institutions and including almost 4,000 children with autism, scientists uncovered a clear genetic link in a few cases. The...

Magnetically Guided Nanoparticles to Target and Destroy Diseased Cells

Currently, we take the shotgun approach to treatments for diseases like cancer. The body is indiscriminately bombarded with drugs and radiation harmful to diseased and healthy cells alike. While we may not cure cancer...

Algorithm Hunts Rare Genetic Disorders from Facial Features in Photos

Even before birth, concerned parents often fret over the possibility that their children may have underlying medical issues. Chief among these worries are rare genetic conditions that can drastically shape the course and reduce...

Using 3D Printing and Design To Change the Way We Look at Disability

The technology involved in creating artificial limbs has come a long way in the last few decades. We have now witnessed a paralyzed man kick a soccer ball at the opening ceremonies of the World Cup, and a...

Bionic Pancreas Promises Big Boost in Health, Quality of Life for Type 1 Diabetics

Diabetes, despite affecting nearly 350 million people worldwide, is not really a controlled illness. Those who have the type 1 form of the illness, in which the pancreas fails to produce the insulin that...

Fasting Helps Cancer Patients Survive Chemotherapy — And It Could Help Us All Live Longer

You’ve probably never heard of Valter Longo, but if you’ve heard about the purported health benefits of intermittent fasting, you’ve likely been exposed to his work. A University of Southern California gerontologist, Longo has...

Massive Military-Funded Project Aims to Re-align Ailing Brains

Deep brain stimulation as a treatment for epilepsy and movement disorders, most notably Parkinson’s disease, has rapidly gone from experimental to standard practice. With devices to provide delicate electro-stimulation to the brain now available...

Scientists Trigger Stem Cells to Produce New Brain Cells

It turns out that an apple a day — or at least an apple spinach salad — does keep the doctor away. But it’s not true that when brain cells die we can’t make...

Singularity Surplus: Computer Convenience For FDA Data, Paper and Pen, Power Outlets

The Scribble pen can identify and reproduce 16 million colors you might come across in daily life. The pen uses a 16-bit RGB color sensor to identify the colors of objects and reproduces them...

A Straightforward Method for Making Wearable Tech

Considering the pace of technological growth in recent decades, the convergence of humans and machines seems a foregone conclusion. Yet, unlike most machines, the body is far too flexible and squishy for modern advanced materials. So it falls on researchers to develop new...

Researchers Close In on the Dream of a Safe, Portable Brain Scanner

If research on the human brain is to come close to meeting the lofty hopes many researchers and government bodies have for it, one thing is going to have to change: Brain scanning will...

Nanotech Method Boosts Conventional Cancer Treatments in Pre-Clinical Trial

The conventional wisdom has it that there’s no silver bullet for treating cancer; the disease simply has too many forms for a one-size-fits-all solution. But there may be, if a recent pre-clinical animal study...

Singularity Surplus: Sweating Robots, Speaking in Tongues, Where Lab Meat Comes From

Advances in exponential technology happen fast — too fast for Singularity Hub to cover them all. This weekly bulletin points to significant developments to keep readers in the know. In an attempt to make robots...

Promising Malaria Vaccine Looks to Employ Robots to Mass Produce Its Product

Imagine that, in the face of substantial technical odds, you developed a vaccine for malaria that, in early trials, was 100 percent effective. But then, due to political wrangling over the budget, you couldn’t...

Daily At-Home Lab Kits Now Available, But Are the Results Meaningful?

an Diego-based Cue is bringing DIY health care to new heights, with an at-home lab kit that runs five standard tests and displays the results in a mobile app. The lab tests inflammation via C-reactive protein, vitamin D levels, female fertility based on Luteinizing hormone, influenza virus, and testosterone levels.

Singularity Surplus: Robotic Furniture and Stuffed Animals

Kids learn with robots; 3D printed liver, no stem cells required, robotic furniture; living forever as computer code

Aging Reversed in the Heart, Brain, and Muscles of Mice Thanks to Blood Factor

The idea that blood is the basic stuff of life dates back to well before the scientific method. Yet, in a pair of new studies, researchers have found that blood — and specifically a growth factor in it known as GDF-11 — spurs the brains, muscles, skeletons and hearts of older mice to look and perform like those of younger mice.

Chilean Incubator Wants Companies Using Tech to Help the Poor

Chilean not-for-profit Socialab runs competitions for technology-based business proposals that address some of the major problems wrought by poverty in the region: food insecurity, lack of clean drinking water, struggling public education and so on. Then it taps its virtual community of 300,000 users to identify the best ideas and fine-tune them.

Facial transplants are safe, viable, and help patients thrive after a decade of success

Since first becoming available in 2005, 28 people have undergone a full or partial facial transplant—a procedure described by Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez as the “Mount Everest” of medical-surgical treatments. Rodriguez is a plastic and reconstructive...

Crowd-Sourced Science Project Discovers How The Eye Perceives Motion

The social gaming venture EyeWire lured citizen scientists to follow retinal neurons at the back of the eye with the chance to level up and outperform competitors. With their help, EyeWire has solved a longstanding mystery about how mammals perceive motion.

Victims of War in Sudan Aided by 3D Printing

Last November, equipped with two 3D printers, a few days' intensive training, and a digital schematic for a 3D printed prosthetic arm, Mick Ebeling flew to war-torn Sudan to find Daniel Omar. Daniel had...

Singularity Surplus: The Good, the Bad and the Beautiful

U.N. goals whittle child and maternal death rates; computer solves word problems so you don't have to; the Milky Way gets an MRI; making fuel out of nothing.

Link Between Mom’s Diet at Conception and Child’s Lifelong Health, Study Reveals

The mother’s nutrition at the time of conception can permanently and fundamentally affect physical characteristics of her offspring, according to a study just published in Nature Communications, by influencing the child's epigenome.

3D Printed Organs, Blood Vessels and All, Takes a Big Step Toward Reality

There’s something a little creepy-sounding about the phrase “lab-grown organs,” but producing human organs in the lab could have a range of such powerful benefits that, if they became widely available, only the rare...

Singularity Surplus: Not, Contrary to Popular Belief, Impossible

3d printing houses, neighborhoods, and audio speakers; growing new cartilage in the lab; Congressional bipartisanship over online privacy.

Have researchers found the ‘fattening gene’?

Collaborating German and Japanese scientists have studied mice lacking a gene that plays a central role in energy metabolism. Their findings? The mice maintain their normal weight, despite consuming foods high in fats. "We established that Sirt7-knockout mice...

SCiO’s Handheld Scanner Aims to Detect Food Ingredients and Identify Pills

An Israeli company is offering a flash drive-sized scanner that can tell users what exactly is in the food or medicine on the table using near-infrared spectroscopy.

The Surprising Medical Value of Poop

A recent study published in The New England Journal of Medicine and an FDA committee hearing suggest that a stool test called Cologuard will likely be approved as a non-invasive screening for colorectal cancer.

Data Scientist Hacks Monitoring Device, Puts Heartbeat Online

Data scientist Jen Lowe’s put her heart online. Open her site, One Human Heartbeat, and a cyclopean red eye blinks in rhythm to yesterday’s heartbeat. Lowe wears a Basis Band fitness tracker. Like other fitness trackers...

Electrical Stimulation Enables Paralyzed Patients to Move Legs and Stand Again

Four paralyzed men who received epidural electrical stimulation were able to regain some voluntary movement of their legs. The finding challenges everything doctors thought they knew about paralysis.

Can Blood Produced From Stem Cells Make Shortages a Thing of the Past?

Stem cell treatments are set to go mainstream as a UK consortium ramps up production of red blood cells from embryonic stem cells with plans to try it on human patients for the first time in 2016. Delivering blood transfusions through stem cells would push such therapies well into the medical mainstream. But it will also require industrial-scale production.

Researchers Record Young Neurons Making Connections, Exchanging Information

We don’t fully understand how neural networks form—that is, how neurons evolve from a few disconnected individual cells into the highly organized and closely related regions of the brain that control the body and...

Lab-Grown Vaginas Provide Normal Sex Lives for Women With Rare Condition

The work of scientists trying to manufacture major human organs like the brain and heart in the lab has generated a lot of buzz, even though it will most likely be decades before the...

Singularity Surplus: Nowhere to Hide

7 in 10 American consumers say privacy concerns will keep them from buying Google Glass; a startup sells a DIY cyborg kit, syringe included; UW researchers show off scary-good age-progression software; rare genetic mutation makes siblings immune to viruses -- can we get in on that?

New Method Points to Cheaper, More Flexible Wearable Computers

Flexible electronics guru John Rogers has developed a wearable electronic patch that incorporates standard silicon chips. The patch uses a microfluidic construction with wires folded to allow it to bend and flex around the rigid off-the-shelf chips.

Network of 75 Million Neurons of the Mouse Brain Mapped for the First Time

A new atlas of study results related to the mouse connectome offers the equivalent of a highway map, with local roads to be filled in later. The atlas, described in a recent paper in Nature, represents more than four years of work undertaken at the Allen Institute for Brain Science. It’s the most detailed information we have on the brain of any animal other than that of the roundworm C. elegans, which has just 302 neurons.

Singularity Surplus: Counting Coup and Calories

Military uses drones as mobile hotspots; sponge injection helps heal gunshot wounds; calorie-counting device questioned; robotic surgeon designed to operate in space.

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